Wednesday, January 27, 2016

Panko Fried Sesame Shrimp

Fried Shrimp, Dipping Sauces and Salad
I discovered this homemade coating for fried oysters a few years ago from a local chef, then tried it on fried shrimp, and now use it for fried chicken and fish fillets.

If you've never tried Panko crumbs, they're coarse crunchy bread crumbs from Japan, made from wheat bread; they also stay crispy longer in recipes whether used as coating for frying or  topping in casseroles.  Asian markets carry them as do most grocery stores.


Fresh or frozen shrimp work well and often on sale around the holidays. A bag of frozen shrimp on hand is convenient for many recipes. Size: (21 count or lower per pound) medium or larger, as they're already cleaned and/or peeled; defrost in slow running cold water.


I make a large batch of coating mixture, keeping it frozen in a plastic bag to take out for use whenever deciding to fry lightly or deep fry food. It's more convenient than making a new batch of coating every time needed, and there's always enough depending on how many servings I'm making or what I'm frying.
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Panko Sesame Fry Mix

Equal amounts of:
Sesame seeds, flour, Panko crumbs
I use 1 cup of of each, then add salt and pepper to taste and for extra "kick" Old Bay type seasoning approximately 1/4 to 1/2 cup.


For shrimp, Butterfly, toss with flour in a bowl to coat lightly, dip in beaten egg combined a little water, then coat with dry Panko mixture by putting the amount of coating needed in a bag (plastic or paper) and toss in shrimp a few at a time shaking the bag until shrimp are coated - take them out and let rest before frying at 350 degrees for a minute or two until golden brown. Fry a few at a time and keep warm in the oven.

For chicken: same procedure, then pan fry until lightly browned and crispy, several minutes on each side; remove to finish by baking in 350 oven until done, approximately 25 minutes.  A digital thermometer testing for 175 degrees on thicker pieces like thighs helps determine "doneness."
For Oysters: coat and fry as for shrimp, and for fish sautee a few minutes on each side on the stove top.